Nurses Week 2016!

Nurses Week 2016

Celebrate Nurses Week 2016 in style with fun stuff and freebies from industry organizations! Click here to check out WeLoveOurNurses.com.

It’s almost time for Nurses Week 2016! Travel Nursing Central would like to wish all of the awesome travel nurses out there an amazing celebration!

Here are a few cool things going on this Nurses Week that we wanted to share with you:

Over at WeLoveOurNurses.com, you can enter two contests, win a scholarship, watch a world record be set, and send out eCards to your friends and co-workers.  Medical Solutions is sharing its We Heart RNs World Record Video featuring Miss Colorado, Nurse Kelley Johnson. There’s also the #NurseLaughLove Instagram Contest, Show ’em the Love Mentor Contest, and free, shareable Nurses Week eCards. Gift cards from Amazon, Ulta, and Tafford Uniforms ranging from $50-$250 are the prizes up for grabs. Students will want to enter the 5th Annual Nurses of Tomorrow Scholarship Contest, which awards three $2,000 scholarships to future nurses.

The Gypsy Nurse is known for having created an amazing community for travel nurses. She will honor a 2016 Gypsy Florence Nightingale with a total prize package of approximately $600 in value that includes free admission to the 2016 Travelers Conference in Las Vegas. Nurses can nominate fellow travelers who they think positively represent travel nursing and inspires others in their travel nursing journeys. The Gypsy Nurse is accepting submissions through May 10!

Cinnabon is celebrating Nurses Week again this year with some sweet treats for nurses. May 6-12, 2016, nurses can visit participating Cinnabons, present their healthcare ID badge, and receive a free Cinnabon Classic Roll or MiniBon!

The Right Solutions is hosting a Nurses Week contest that will give away an Apple iPad Air2 and cash prizes to lucky travelers.

Fastaff is celebrating with a Nurse Family giveaway, based on the idea that nurses collect a family of colleagues as they band together to get their challenging work accomplished. Entrants can honor a member of their “nurse family” for the chance to win a $500 Southwest Airlines gift card for both parties.

At DiscoverNursing.com, Johnson & Johnson’s Campaign for Nursing’s Future has free nurse-themed magnets, coloring books, a “Nurses Heal” pin, and many other great and free resources for nurses and nurse educators like videos and software, brochures, posters, and more.

Lippincott Nursing Center is offering discounts on some CE activities and books, free games and articles, an opportunity to share your nursing story and win a FitBit Alta, and more!

So, that’s a good start, but what other Nurses Week fun, contests, free stuff, and other festivities do you know about? Please feel free to share yours in the comments!

Happy Nurses Week 2016, everybody!

Share

2016 ANA Conference Focus is on Quality, Safety, and Staffing

2016 ANA Conference Focus is on Quality, Safety, and Staffing

2016 ANA Conference Focus is on Quality, Safety, and Staffing

Travel nurses do a lot to improve nurse to patient ratios, thus improving quality and safety at facilities nationwide.

That’s why this year’s American Nurses Association conference topic is particularly relevant for travelers and other healthcare professionals.

The 2016 ANA Conference focus is on quality, safety, and staffing — “Connecting Quality, Safety and Staffing to Improve Outcomes” is the official title.

The 2016 conference will be held in Lake Buena Vista, Florida, March 9-11.

According to the ANA, the conference will explore new innovations in nursing and examine the factors that “affect nurses’ ability to deliver high-quality care.”

“Conference sessions will bring you the latest strategies, research, and best practices to improve outcomes through quality, safety and staffing. Attendees will learn from evidence-based research and discover innovations they can start using immediately. Join your peers at the only conference for nurses focusing on quality outcomes,” they continue on their website.

They are offering early bird registration through November 20, 2015.

Click here to learn more about the 2016 ANA Conference, its speakers, CEs, agenda and more.

Share

Nurses Week 2015 Freebies and Fun

Nurses Week 2015 Freebies and FunHappy Nurses Week! Travel Nursing Central has put together a roundup of Nurses Week 2015 freebies and fun to help you and your fellow nurses celebrate YOUR week in style!

Here are some fun, free, festive happenings this Nurses Week:

  • Cinnabon is giving away a free Cinnabon Classic Roll or MiniBon® roll May 6-12 to nurses who show their healthcare ID badge.
  • Amazon.com has free eBook downloads of The White Linen Nurse.
  • Medical Solutions is celebrating over at WeLoveOurNurses.com with The Real Nurses of Nurses Week photo gallery (including prizes such as Amazon and Tafford Uniforms gift cards from $25-$100), their Annual Nurses of Tomorrow Scholarship Contest (which awards three $2000 scholarships), Nurses Week eCards, and a team fundraising effort for Nurses House, a national fund for nurses in need.
  • NurseEyeRoll.com is giving away Nabee socks, Nurse Watches, and signed copies of two books — The Nurses and Becoming Nursey.
  • Fazoli’s, is offering nurses wearing scrubs who show their healthcare ID badge a free Twisted Trio entrée with the purchase of a drink at participating locations, from May 6-12. The fast Italian chain will also surprise more than 1,000 nurses with meals at various children’s hospitals.
  • The Right Solutions is hosting a Nurses Month Luau with prizes including an Apple iPad Air 2. Amazon Fire TV, and Visa gift cards.
  • Discovery Life Channel is taking nominations for the chance to win a walk-on role in “Untold Stories of the ER,” plus a trip for two to Vancouver, British Columbia and $500 spending cash.
  • Diversity Nursing is doing its annual $5,000 Education Award. There is no essay required, but hurry — registration closes May 7th!
  • Lippincott Nursing Center has several of discounts, daily deals, and giveaways.
  • Johnson & Jonson’s Campaign for Nursing Future is offering free pins, magnets, and activity books you can find here.

We hope you’ll enjoy these Nurses Week 2015 freebies and fun! If you know of any opportunities that we did not include, please be sure to share them in the comments.

Share

New Nurse Blog: Fighting Dinosaurs

Nurse with boxing gloves

New nurse blog, Fighting Dinosaurs, aims to empowers nurses ro make their voices heard.

A new nurse blog, Fighting Dinosaurs, launched recently with the tagline “Evolving Nursing Through Grassroots Voices.”

Founded by Alene Nitzky, Ph.D., RN, OCN, the site says it will offer “a safe and engaging place for working nurse narrative.”

According to the Fighting Dinosaurs website, “The voice of the bedside nurse is crucial to our healthcare system’s success, but it is currently excluded from modern dialogue. This blog aims to amplify dynamic nursing voices, help nurses infiltrate media outlets with flawless, safe copy, and fight together to establish a prominent foothold in the changing world of healthcare and to support our profession’s future.”

So far, the site’s mission seems to be squared on advocating for empowering nurses to speak out on their own behalf (and on behalf of the profession as a whole) about workers’ right and protections. The challenge laid out in one blog post, The Courage to Look in the Mirror, is for nurses to look at their own ways of dealing with things and challenge themselves to take action.

Other current posts cover nurses’ rights, reform within the nursing world, being authentic in your voice, understanding that your voice counts, workplace conditions, healthcare executives and corporations, and more.

Fighting Dinosaurs also accepts submissions and makes a call for nurses to contribute ideas and topics for the site to cover.

While invoking dinosaurs seems to symbolically suggest that the way things are and have been in nursing is archaic, there are also literally dinosaurs everywhere in the images, which is just kind of fun.

Any entity or platform that encourages nurses to make their voices heard and their professional lives better is a good step in empowering nurses. Nurses are integral to healthcare and listening to their needs, opinions, and any other feedback they can contribute is hugely important to the overall system.

Click here to check out Fighting Dinosaurs.

Share

6 Famous African American Nurses

In honor of African American History Month, Travel Nursing Central would like to recognize a handful of the amazing African American nurses from throughout history.

According to a Department for Professional Employees 2012 fact sheet, African American RNs make up just 10.4% of the nursing population. That leaves a lot of untapped talent out there, and we’d love to see greater diversity in nurse and travel nurse demographics.

Here’s a little bit about 6 famous African American nurses, who will hopefully be an inspiration for future generations of nurses and travel nurses:

Mary Seacole Nurse

Mary Seacole

Mary Seacole

Although she encountered discrimination, Jamaican-born Seacole was instrumental to pioneering nursing and medical care in the 1800s. She traveled on her own dime to treat wounded soldiers from both sides during the Crimean War, and also established a boarding house where injured patients could recover and rehabilitate.

Mary Eliza Mahoney Nurse

Mary Eliza Mahoney

Mary Eliza Mahoney

There were many who functioned as nurses before her, but Mahoney was the first African American licensed registered nurse. After graduating in 1879 and practicing, she went on to cofound the National Association of Colored Graduate Nurses and was also one of the original members of an early incarnation of the American Nurses Association.

Harriet Tubman Nurse

Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman

Her name is synonymous with the Underground Railroad and women’s rights activism, but Tubman was also a nurse who served the Union Army. In 1908 she also created the Harriet Tubman Home for the Aged, which specialized in caring for elderly African Americans.

Sojourner Truth Nurse

Sojourner Truth

Sojourner Truth

Born into slavery in 1797, she’s known mostly as an abolitionist and women’s rights activist, but Truth was originally a nurse for the family she served. Later in life she was instrumental in advocating for funding for essential nurse training programs.

Hazel W. Johnson-Brown Nurse

Hazel W. Johnson-Brown

Hazel W. Johnson-Brown

Twice named the Army Nurse of the Year, Johnson-Brown faced down racial discrimination to become a nurse (eventually with a Master’s and PhD. Her skill led her to become the first African American woman to lead the US Army Nurse Corps and also the first to be promoted to brigadier general.

Estelle Massey Osborne

Estelle Massey Osborne

Estelle Massey Osborne

The first African American woman to earn a Master’s degree in Nursing, she fought throughout her life for visibility and educational equality for all nurses.

There are SO many more great examples, but we hope this list of 6 famous African American nurses is inspirational.

As for the present day we invite you to check out the National Black Nurses Association (founded by another great African American nurse leader, Betty Smith Williams). Their mission is “To represent and provide a forum for black nurses to advocate for and implement strategies to ensure access to the highest quality of healthcare for persons of color.” Click here to learn more about the NBNA.

Share

Nurses in TV and Film

woman with tv remote

What do you think about the portrayal of nurses in TV and film?

I’ve seen a flurry of blogs posts lately about nurses in TV and film, as well as about the portrayal of nurses in media.

Travel Nursing Blogs recently rounded up their picks for the “10 Best TV Nurses.” It’s a quality bunch from a variety of comedies and dramas alike, with some of the most loved TV nurses like China Beach’s Lt. Colleen McMurphy, Scrubs’ Carla Espinosa, Maj. Margaret “Hot Lips” Houlihan from M*A*S*H, and the titular character, Nurse Jackie. (This piece also briefly mentions the MTV reality show “Scrubbing In,” which followed the lives of a group of travel nurses and was quite controversial due to its racy depiction of the nursing profession. Under pressure from nursing groups, MTV made a few changes, but did not immediately cancel the show, which now appears to be on permanent hiatus.)

Fastaff recently blogged about the “10 Best Movies About Nursing” — a diverse list that included documentaries, comedies, dramas, and even made for TV movies, including The English Patient, Meet the Parents, and Nurses: If Florence Could See Us Now. The blog said that folks enjoy watching movies about nurses and that the films can provide “valuable insights into how other people view nurses.”

On that note of how nurses are viewed in media, over at NurseTogether, a blog asked “How Does the Media Portray Nurses?” The author discussed the often negative portrayal of nurses in TV, making them at times seems like stereotypes (the “naughty nurse,” for example) and also depicting nurses as subservient to physicians and sometimes as little more than errand runners. In summary, this blog says that despite less than favorable media depictions, the nursing profession is regularly ranked high in terms respect and ethics, and the best thing a nurse can do to set a good example is keep doing a great job.

Although not a super recent post, Minority Nurse has a great blog called “Lights, Camera, Accuracy: Nurses in the Media” that begins:

“Your favorite movie or TV show may feature a spunky heroine who’s smart, capable, and great at her job, but chances are she’s not a nurse. Although TV shows and movies are known to take artistic liberties with many professions — such as homicide detectives, lawyers, and politicians — the importance of what nurses do has been consistently downplayed and marginalized in mainstream media.”

The post continues through an interesting detail of nurses in TV and film, with an extra emphasis on looking at how minority nurses are portrayed. There is also some really great advice about how to manage such media portrayals, what it really means to be a nurse, and how nurses can gain more exposure and credit for everything they do as healthcare professionals.

So, wow — it’s a lot to think about! Of course, every day on the job you influence how nurses are thought of, but the media is also a very strong tool. Ideally, I think it would be great to see more strong, positive, three-dimensional, accurate portrayals of nurses in the media.

What are some of your favorite portrayals of nurses in TV and film? Share your thoughts in the comments!

Share