Make Yourself More Marketable: Simple steps to get the job you want

Promote your value Make Yourself More Marketable: Simple steps to get the job you want

Abracadabra: Make yourself more marketable with these simple steps to get the job you want.

By Jeff Della Rosa
The Right Solutions

We’re excited you are looking to work in travel nursing. We want you to be happy with your career choice. We hope you land that dream job — the one you’ve always wanted but is seemingly out of reach. You wonder what more you can do to accomplish your goal. We’re here to help. We’ve done the research, and we’ve put together a series of blogs to give you some insight on how to get there. The first in the series is how to show prospective employers your value.

Dust off the awards, certificates and trophies you have earned as a nurse. Amaze a prospective employer with all your accomplishments. Sell yourself, but don’t sound like a salesperson, according to Harvard Business Review. Tell a story about an issue you or your department faced, explain your responsibilities and how you completed them. Be sure to say that you completed your responsibility. Speak about what happened as a result of your or your team’s accomplishment. You might have been recognized by a hospital. Show this recognition. Also present your caught-in-the-act and patient care awards. Don’t worry about being too modest on your skills checklist. Explain your experience and skills in a way that shows the value you have to offer, according to Forbes. Talk about what you have to contribute to a facility. Say whether you are bilingual, tell them about the charting systems you know and if you were a supervisor or have charge experience.

Present a solid work history. Show your experience at various hospitals. It is important to broaden your work history by taking shifts at multiple hospitals. The more places you work, the more people you work with. The more people you work with, the more you know. One of them might be your next solid reference who helps you get the assignment you want. Your solid reference must be someone who is easily reached and available to take call. Make sure to have a number of people who are willing to promote you. Have their cell phone numbers ready. When you have someone who can speak for you, it feels less like you are bragging and makes you look more credible, according to job-hunt.org. Get testimonials from several people to show how you are the right fit for the position. Another good source of information is a performance review from a supervisor. Use a positive review to describe your strengths. You can also use this information on your resume, which will be covered in an upcoming blog in this series.

While speaking highly on what you have to offer is important, it’s even more vital to show a broad work history as a nurse. Check back next month for the second blog in our series, and we will give precise details on how to develop your skills and succeed as a travel nurse.

Jeff Della Rosa is social media coordinator for The Right Solutions — a nationwide healthcare staffing company. Reach him via email at jdellarosa@therightsolutions.com. Find out more about The Right Solutions on our website, www.therightsolutions.com. Also, check us out on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Pinterest.

 

share save 171 16 Make Yourself More Marketable: Simple steps to get the job you want

In the News: Kaiser Nurse Strike

Nurse Strike In the News: Kaiser Nurse Strike

In the News: Kaiser Nurse Strike

Nurse strikes happen. And when they do it’s often traveling nurses who step in as replacements to ensure that patient care does not suffer while their peers make a statement about safe staffing levels, contract negotiations, and other such issues. Currently in the news: the Kaiser Nurse Strike.

This week, an estimated 16,000-18,000 nurses went on a two-day strike from Kaiser Permanente hospitals in California’s Bay Area and nearby locations. The buzz has been that the nurses are striking about a perceived lack of Ebola preparedness. But, according to NBC Bay Area, a spokeswoman from the California Hospital Association, Jan Emerson-Shea, says the California Nurses Association union is “using the crisis to further its own agenda.” Emerson-Shea told NBC Bay Area that the union was “using Ebola as a ruse.”

The timing of the strike coincides with the National Nurses United union’s national “day of action” through which thousands more nurses across more than a dozen states have been rallying behind enhanced Ebola preparedness. In response specifically to the Ebola issue, Kaiser says it, “thoroughly follows state and federal protocols on Ebola preparation and response.”

According to NBC Bay Area, “The registered nurses on strike said they need Kaiser to focus on enhancing staffing levels to ensure safe patient services, for instance, not rushing a patient out on early discharge.”

A Kaiser rep countered that the system “matches the nursing staff to patient needs,” adding that Kaiser has “incredibly safe staffing” and offers resources in support of its nursing staff.

The Kaiser system and the California Nurses Association union have reportedly been in contact negotiations since July 2014, and reports indicate that these talks have been very strained.

Kaiser hospitals and facilities have stayed open during the strike, with replacement nurses providing patient care for them to do so.

Here’s hoping that whatever the outcome is, it includes safe staffing levels which are optimum for preventing nurse burnout and providing safe patient care.

share save 171 16 In the News: Kaiser Nurse Strike

Travel Nursing Central’s Updated Blog Feed Aggregator

Blogs Bullseye Travel Nursing Central’s Updated Blog Feed Aggregator

Bullseye! Travel Nursing Central’s updated blog feed aggregator helps keep you in touch with all the recent travel nurse news and blogs.

There are a so many travel nursing related blogs out there — it can be hard to keep up with them all! But being able to read from them on a regular basis is super helpful to travel nurses at all different stages of their careers — from early stages of travel nurse curiosity to pulling the trigger on your first assignment to vet status in the industry.

Because of the helpfulness of travel nurse industry blogs to travelers and prospective travelers, Travel Nursing Central works to bring you a simple one-stop shop by aggregating the travel nursing blogs you want to read. We have recently made some updates to our blog aggregator, in hopes that it functions even better for our readers now. In addition to the Travel Nursing Central blog itself, Travel Nursing Central’s updated blog feed aggregator includes:

  • RN Network
  • Aureus Medical
  • TravelNursing.org
  • Fastaff
  • Medical Solutions
  • Blue Pipes
  • I Love Travel Nursing
  • TravelNursing.com
  • Highway Hypodermics
  • The Right Solutions
  • Gypsy Nurse
  • Travel Nursing Blogs

You can click here to go to Travel Nursing Central’s updated blog feed aggregator. Then, simply use the drop down menu to select from the various blog feeds listed above. You can use this tool to view a title and quick snippet of each blog’s past 10 posts, as well as the date it was posted.

We hope you’ll be able to use Travel Nursing Central’s updated blog feed aggregator to help stay informed and up to date on all kinds of travel nursing industry related topics, such as: housing, pay and bonuses, contracts, taxes, continuing education, locations, holidays, clothing, footwear, scrubs, and accessories, companies and recruiters, the benefits of travel nursing, beating nurse burnout, succeeding in the industry, interviewing tips, contests, current news related to healthcare and nursing, and so much more!

share save 171 16 Travel Nursing Central’s Updated Blog Feed Aggregator

Travel Nurses Day 2014

TND Blog Image 300x200 Travel Nurses Day 2014Looking for a reason to celebrate this week? Friday, October 10, 2014, is Travel Nurses Day 2014.

This is the second annual Travel Nurses Day, after the holiday was created in 2013 by travel nursing staffing agency Medical Solutions. According to their blog, “It’s a day set aside to honor all of the amazing, adventurous, adept Travel Nurses out there.”

Games and chances to win prizes are the way they’re celebrating Travel Nurses Day 2014 at TravelNursesDay.com. Games include three photo finds (spot the differences between two photos), three Travel-Libs (choose certain words to fill out a story about travel nursing), and a quiz to determine “Where should I travel next?”

Playing the games makes traveling nurses eligible to win one of the prizes, from a pretty impressive pot, including:

  • One $2500 vacation voucher to a destination of the winner’s choice
  • Three Kindle Fire HD 6 tablets
  • Fifteen $50 gift cards from Zappos, Amazon, and Starbucks
  • Three $50 gift cards from Tafford Uniforms

It’s pretty nice to have your own day to be celebrated as a travel nurse!

Visit Travel NursesDay.com to play games, sign up for alerts, and learn more.

share save 171 16 Travel Nurses Day 2014

Nurses in TV and Film

Woman Remote TV Nurses in TV and Film

What do you think about the portrayal of nurses in TV and film?

I’ve seen a flurry of blogs posts lately about nurses in TV and film, as well as about the portrayal of nurses in media.

Travel Nursing Blogs recently rounded up their picks for the “10 Best TV Nurses.” It’s a quality bunch from a variety of comedies and dramas alike, with some of the most loved TV nurses like China Beach’s Lt. Colleen McMurphy, Scrubs’ Carla Espinosa, Maj. Margaret “Hot Lips” Houlihan from M*A*S*H, and the titular character, Nurse Jackie. (This piece also briefly mentions the MTV reality show “Scrubbing In,” which followed the lives of a group of travel nurses and was quite controversial due to its racy depiction of the nursing profession. Under pressure from nursing groups, MTV made a few changes, but did not immediately cancel the show, which now appears to be on permanent hiatus.)

Fastaff recently blogged about the “10 Best Movies About Nursing” — a diverse list that included documentaries, comedies, dramas, and even made for TV movies, including The English Patient, Meet the Parents, and Nurses: If Florence Could See Us Now. The blog said that folks enjoy watching movies about nurses and that the films can provide “valuable insights into how other people view nurses.”

On that note of how nurses are viewed in media, over at NurseTogether, a blog asked “How Does the Media Portray Nurses?” The author discussed the often negative portrayal of nurses in TV, making them at times seems like stereotypes (the “naughty nurse,” for example) and also depicting nurses as subservient to physicians and sometimes as little more than errand runners. In summary, this blog says that despite less than favorable media depictions, the nursing profession is regularly ranked high in terms respect and ethics, and the best thing a nurse can do to set a good example is keep doing a great job.

Although not a super recent post, Minority Nurse has a great blog called “Lights, Camera, Accuracy: Nurses in the Media” that begins:

“Your favorite movie or TV show may feature a spunky heroine who’s smart, capable, and great at her job, but chances are she’s not a nurse. Although TV shows and movies are known to take artistic liberties with many professions — such as homicide detectives, lawyers, and politicians — the importance of what nurses do has been consistently downplayed and marginalized in mainstream media.”

The post continues through an interesting detail of nurses in TV and film, with an extra emphasis on looking at how minority nurses are portrayed. There is also some really great advice about how to manage such media portrayals, what it really means to be a nurse, and how nurses can gain more exposure and credit for everything they do as healthcare professionals.

So, wow — it’s a lot to think about! Of course, every day on the job you influence how nurses are thought of, but the media is also a very strong tool. Ideally, I think it would be great to see more strong, positive, three-dimensional, accurate portrayals of nurses in the media.

What are some of your favorite portrayals of nurses in TV and film? Share your thoughts in the comments!

share save 171 16 Nurses in TV and Film

Nursing Throughout History

Nurse Stamp Nursing Throughout History

There’s so much to learn about nursing throughout history!

We usually reserve this space for topics specifically related to travel nursing, from how travel nurse staffing saves lives to how travel nursing can improve your career.

But today we’re going to stretch that to traveling through time, as we check out Penn Nursing Science’s resources on nursing throughout history at their Nursing, History, and Healthcare website.

The site aims to offer historical background on issues and topics related to the nursing profession. Aimed at providers, researchers, consumers, educators, and policymakers, the site “addresses a wide range of topics critical to comprehending and broadening our understanding of health care and nursing concerns, including the role of professional nurses, nurse shortages, workplace problems, and public health issues.”

There is tons of information about education, home care, workforce, issues, institutions, and more.

My favorite is a really cool History of Nursing Timeline running from 1700-2000. The timeline begins with nursing and healthcare in the colonial period, when an almshouse opened in Philadelphia that would later become Philadelphia General Hospital.

Here are just a few more of the many highlights:

1872: School for Nurses with one-year curriculum offered at New England Hospital for Women and Children

1879: The first professional African American nurse graduates from New England Hospital and Training School for Women and Children

1885: Clara S. Weeks Shaw publishes the first textbook by a nurse, A Textbook of Nursing

1893: At the Chicago World Colombian Exposition nurses convene to form the first national professional association for nurse.

1900: American Journal of Nursing is first published.

1911: The Associated Alumna of the United States is rechristened the American Nurses Association.

1918: Army School of Nursing is established.

1938: The ANA publishes Incomes, Salaries, and Employment Conditions of Nurses.  

1952: First two-year associate nursing degree program is offered.

1964: Nurse Training Act passes.

1969: American Association of Colleges of Nurses forms.

1992: The Joint Commission for Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations adds at-large nursing seat to its Board, ceasing nearly three decades of ANA lobbying efforts.

1999: The nation’s first state law mandating specific nurse-to-patient ratios is signed.

That’s just a sample — I left a lot of really cool stuff out!

Click here to check out Penn Nursing Science’s wealth of information on nursing throughout history

share save 171 16 Nursing Throughout History

Travel Nursing Blog Roundup

With the kids going back to school and what’s usually the busiest travel nursing season approaching, we thought it was a good time to see what some of our favorite travel nursing blogs are buzzing about.

Read below for Travel Nursing Central’s travel nursing blog roundup.

TNB 150x150 Travel Nursing Blog RoundupTravel Nursing Blogs

Save the Date: Travel Nurses Day 2014

This post reminds travel nurses to save the date for the upcoming second annual Travel Nurses Day, Friday, October 10, 2014.

 

TheGypsyNurse 86 6001 Travel Nursing Blog RoundupGypsy Nurse Blog — Guest Post by Sarah Owens RN

Preparing Our Family for Travel

Sarah’s post discusses how she, her husband, and their three children plan ahead for life as a traveling family. From hauling their belongings to education, this is a great blog for any travel nurses working and traveling with a family in tow.

Soliant Blog 150x150 Travel Nursing Blog RoundupSoliant Health

Top 10 Cities for Travel Nurses to Spend (a short) Time In

The author runs down a list of picks for nurses to consider assignments in, including: Burbank, Denver, San Diego, Seattle, San Francisco, and more.

Medical Solutions How Not To Videos 150x150 Travel Nursing Blog RoundupMedical Solutions

How NOT To Travel Nursing Videos

Announcement of a new travel nursing video/resource series — with a comical twist. Short videos show what not to do as a traveler, in a humorous light, then articles provide information on how to manage the same situation the right way.

TNAA Travel Nursing Blog RoundupTravel Nurse Across America

Four Apps for Staying Social While on the Road

Post detailing Vine, Google Hangout, Timehop, and Find My Friends — all apps through which travel nurses can better stay in touch with family and friends while they are on assignment.

Please share any blog hosts in the comments that we should consider for future a Travel Nursing Blog Roundup!

share save 171 16 Travel Nursing Blog Roundup

Best Hospitals Announced

Hospital Sign Best Hospitals Announced

U.S. News and World Report announces its best hospitals for 2014/2015.

Every year U.S. News and World Report publishes an annual ranking of the best hospitals in the United States.

This July the publication released its list for 2014/2015. After considering 5,000 hospitals, 17 were chosen for the honor roll.

The top 10 best hospitals announced were:

  1. Mayo Clinic (Rochester, Minnesota)
  2. Massachusetts General (Boston, Massachusetts)
  3. Johns Hopkins (Baltimore, Maryland)
  4. Cleveland Clinic (Cleveland, Ohio)
  5. UCLA Med Center (Los Angeles, California)
  6. New York Presbyterian University Hospital of Colombia and Cornell (New York, New York)
  7. Hospitals of the University of Pennsylvania-Penn Presbyterian (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
  8. UCSF Med Center (San Francisco, California)
  9. Brigham and Women’s Hospital (Boston, Massachusetts)
  10. 10. Northwestern Memorial (Chicago, Illinois)

To see the full list of 17, click here. What do you think of the Best Hospitals Announced by U.S. News and World Report? Have you ever worked in any of them?

share save 171 16 Best Hospitals Announced

2014 Travelers Conference

TravCon2014 2014 Travelers Conference

The 2014 Travelers Conference is coming this September!

September 23-24 are going to be the dates for the 2014 Travelers Conference!

The annual conference will once again be held at the Flamingo Hotel and Casino, located on the Las Vegas strip. The 2014 Travelers Conference is hosted by PanTravelers, and according to its website, it has grown into the largest single gathering of healthcare travelers in the U.S.

“Organized by volunteers who are themselves current or former travelers, the purpose of this event is to provide a relaxed setting that gives travelers an opportunity to network with other travelers and top industry insiders,” reads the Travelers Conference site.

You can still nab the early registration discounted price of $89 (for both days) prior to August 1st. Standard registration is $99, from August 1st-September 1st. And, if the event is not yet sold out (as it was last year by this time) the last minute registration fee is $115. PanTravelers contributing members are entitled to a 15% discount on the cost of conference registration.

This year there will also be a Newbie Boot Camp, Monday, September 22, from 1-5 p.m. This will allow new travelers the chance to learn from experienced travelers and staff. It is completely free, with your paid 2014 Travelers Conference registration.

As of this posting, the 2013 information was still posted under schedule and speakers — to give an idea of what attendees can expect. But, there is information about the 2014 Welcome Receptions and Gypsy Nurse Luncheon, and the full roster and schedule will be posted as they develop.

Click here to learn more about the 2014 Travelers Conference. If you have any further questions, you can contact the organizers through that link.

Have you ever been to a Travelers Conference in the past, and, do you plan to attend the 2014 Travelers Conference? Let us know in the comments.

share save 171 16 2014 Travelers Conference

Travel Nurse Staffing Saves Lives

Blue Scrubs Travel Nurse Staffing Saves Lives

Your work as a travel nurse provides safer staffing and saves lives!

Most nurses are inspired to do what they do for altruistic reasons. The idea and practice of helping others in need is a huge motivator for those within or thinking about joining the nursing profession.

Because of this drive to help others, many nurses struggle with improper staffing levels, knowing they are giving their all but sometimes unable to deliver the best patient care possible when assigned too many patients or put into an unsafe situation on the job.

This is why travel nursing is such a crucially important career path!

Travel nurses go where they are most needed, to provide care to patients and much-needed relief to overworked perm staff.

Many surveys have indicated that nurse staffing levels are quite often unsafe and more nurses may be needed to provide proper patient care within hospitals. Yet another recent survey, commissioned by the Massachusetts Nurses Association/National Nurses United, indicated that nurses reported that understaffing led to patient injury (46%), longer hospital stays (51%), and medication errors (57%).

Travel nursing is a way to sort of double down on helping others. You can help patients, hospitals, and other nurses — all while taking the opportunity to travel and explore new locations!

If you’re thinking about getting into travel nursing but don’t know where to begin, Travel Nursing Central can be an excellent resource for you. This site offers advice, checklists, information on housing, updates on current events and news relevant to the industry, and information and rankings on hospitals and travel nursing companies.

One of our most popular site features is our annual ranking of travel nurse companies. Click here to see the list for 2014.

With an important understanding for how travel nurse staffing saves lives, we are happy to help you get on the road to helping others through travel nursing. Click around and let us know if you have any questions!

share save 171 16 Travel Nurse Staffing Saves Lives