4 Simple Stretches for the Travel Nurse

Whether you're on a mountain top or in the middle of your shift, you can do these quick stretches anywhere!

Whether you’re on a mountain top or in the middle of your shift, you can do these quick stretches anywhere!

You spend most of your day caring for patients, and that can be a full body workout. After a long 12-hour shift, the last thing you probably want to do is go to the gym. And while we certainly don’t blame you, your personal fitness shouldn’t always take a back seat.  With just a few minutes each day, you can actually help prevent potential injuries and increase your endurance when you practice these 4 simple stretches for the travel nurse:

Cat and Camel Stretch: This easy to learn stretch can help relieve lower back pain and help strengthen your spinal cord. According to WebMD, a static Cat and Camel stretch can be done using the following steps:

  • Lace your fingers together and turn your palms to face outward in front of you.
  • Reach your arms as far as you can, curving your back and shoulders forward.
  • Hold for roughly 10 seconds.
  • Release your fingers, and grab your wrists or fingers behind your back.
  • Raise your arms as high as you can behind your back without releasing your hands so your chest opens and your shoulders roll back.

Lying Bed Stretch: According to nursing blog Scrubs.com, the lying bed stretch can help reduce back and neck pain. And the best part? As its name implies, you don’t have to leave your bed for this one!

  • Simply lie back on your bed.
  • Raise both arms over your head, so that your elbows face the ceiling and your hands dangle over the edge of the bed.
  • Hold for 15 seconds, then slowly bring your hands back to your side.
  • Repeat one to two times as needed.

Half Dog at the Wall: This modified yoga pose is also great for the busy travel nurse. All you need is a wall and a few seconds of free time. Doyouyoga.com suggests this stretch to help relieve stress and boost your energy level:

  • Stand facing a wall, about a leg’s length apart.
  • Place your hands on the wall roughly at shoulder height.
  • Press your hands against the wall, and bend your knees a bit and slowly walk your feet away from the wall.
  • Keeping your hips positioned over your feet, gradually walk out until your arms are straight and form a long line with your torso and belly.
  • Push your arms strongly towards the wall, while creating an upward lift from your knees to your hips.
  • Gradually straighten your knees.
  • Hold this position for 10 seconds.
  • Slowly come back up.

Supine Pelvic Tilt: This classic exercise routine works well for those of you who suffer from low back pain. So basically, all nurses everywhere, right? This stretch can take a bit more time, but it’s worth the effort! The American Council on Exercise recommends you follow these steps:

  • Lie back on a mat or the floor with your knees bent, your feet flat on the ground, and your arms at your sides in a “T” position.
  • As you exhale, use your abdominal muscles to press your low back into the floor. Be careful to not lift your hips. Hold this position for a short time.
  • Next, slowly inhale and slant your pelvis in the opposite direction. This should create an arch between your low back and the floor. Again, make sure to keep your hips and tailbone on the ground. Hold this position briefly, then return to your starting position.
  • Rest a few seconds between each set. Depending on the amount of time you have, you can do 2-3 sets at a time.

As a travel nurse, you’re constantly on the move, but that doesn’t mean you have to live with constant back pain and stress. These quick stretches can help you let go of stress, relieve your tired and sore muscles, and help prevent personal injuries on the job.

What other activities help you unwind after a long day?

Share

5 Fantastic National Parks Travel Nurses Should Visit This Fall

The U.S. National Park Service celebrates its centennial anniversary this year, so it’s the perfect time for travel nurses to explore some of America’s natural wonders. Take a break from your busy travel nurse schedule and discover the majesty of the Grand Canyon or reconnect with nature at Yosemite. Need some inspiration to help you get started? National Geographic has listed the Top 10 Most Visited National Parks, and we think the first five parks on their list are fantastic for fall:

  1. Smoky Mountains autumn

    Straddling the North Carolina and Tennessee border, the Great Smoky Mountain range is part of an international biosphere reserve and a designated UNESCO World Heritage site.

    Great Smoky Mountains National Park, North Carolina/Tennessee: Experience the Great Smoky Mountains National Park as its beautiful landscapes explode into vibrant fall color. With more than 800 miles of hiking trails and auto tours, you can explore the nation’s most popular park on foot or by car. Avoid the summer crowds and visit during the fall season so you can appreciate on your own the natural fog that often hangs over this mountain range.

  1. Grand Canyon

    Take a guided river trip on the Colorado River as it winds through the Grand Canyon.

    Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona: With its breathtaking views, numerous hiking trails, and whitewater rafting tours, the Grand Canyon should be on every travel nurse’s bucket list. According to National Geographic, even from the best vantage point, you’ll only be able to see a fraction of the canyon’s 277 miles. No matter your view though, this mile-deep geologic wonder will be sure to leave you inspired. Sunrise and sunset tours are especially popular.

  1. Rocky Mountain National Park

    Longs Peak in Rocky Mountain National Park could be your next climbing adventure.

    Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado: If you enjoy a challenging mountain climbing experience, look no further than Longs Peak in Rocky Mountain National Park. One of Colorado’s “Fourteeners”, Longs Peak offers those who reach its summit commanding views of the region. If you’re not quite ready for Longs Peak, you can still go camping or mountain biking. Nearby towns like Estes Park also provide tourists with fun dining and shopping experiences.

  1. Yosemite magical autumn (P)

    Step away from the concrete jungle and enjoy the bright, jewel-toned colors of fall at Yosemite National Park.

    Yosemite National Park, California: After visiting Yosemite, you’ll know why explorer and naturalist John Muir felt inspired to write, “Climb the mountains and get their good tidings. Nature’s peace will flow into you as sunshine into trees.” Nature lovers won’t be disappointed here. Just as John Muir did generations ago, you can stand in awe of Yosemite’s massive sequoias, soak up the impressive view at Glacier Point, and discover the park’s world-famous waterfalls.

  1. Grand Prismatic Spring, Yellowstone National park

    Yellowstone’s Grand Prismatic Spring, shown here, is one of the largest natural hot springs in the world.

    Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming: As the world’s first national park, Yellowstone remains the crown jewel of the U.S. National Park Service. Established in 1872, Yellowstone has long captured the imaginations of travelers worldwide, and it’s not hard to understand why. Visitors can watch Old Faithful erupt, spot wildlife in the Lamar Valley, and take in the Grand Prismatic Spring, the largest spring in the U.S.

Want to learn more about which national park you should explore next? Click here to see National Geographic’s complete list of the Top 10 Most Visited National Parks.

Have you been to one of these parks? What was your experience there?

Share

5 Must-Read Travel Nurse Blog Posts

This Labor Day weekend, relax and catch up on all your favorite Travel Nurse blogs!

This Labor Day weekend, relax and catch up on all your favorite travel nurse blogs!

As a travel nurse, you know it’s sometimes difficult to find the time to stay current on your favorite blogs. So, in honor of the upcoming Labor Day weekend, Travel Nursing Central took on the task of finding this week’s 5 must-read travel nurse blog posts for you. Grab a cup of coffee, relax, and start reading as you celebrate Labor Day!

 

10 Things A Nurse Wants To Hear… Never, Nurse Buff: Nurse Buff takes a humorous look at the daily joys of being a nurse. Be prepared to laugh as you read — this post is full of funny phrases you’ll be all too familiar with.

Online Safety Tips, The Gypsy Nurse: This blog is filled with great content for the travel nurse, and its latest article is no exception. It’s always a good idea to refresh yourself on good online safety habits, especially since most travel nurses rely on the internet while on the road.

Dear Nurses, Love Z Dogg MD, TravelNursingBlogs.com: TravelNursingBlogs.com has a reputation as a fun and informative resource for travel nurses. The blog’s most current post, a music video by Z Dogg MD, is a tribute to all nurses. With Labor Day just around the corner, it’s also touchingly appropriate. Watch it! We guarantee it will make you smile!

The Top 11 Travel Nursing Companies, Blue Pipes: This popular travel nursing blog has graciously listed the top 11 travel nurse companies. The best part? The Blue Pipes team based these rankings on traveler reviews across social media platforms, so it’s an excellent way to find a company that provides great service.

The 25 Best Nursing Jobs, TopRNtoBSN.com: Are you a nursing student and not sure yet what kind of nurse you want to be? Or maybe you’re a veteran nurse in need of a change? Then, look no further than this TopRNtoBSN.com’s article. Travel nurses won’t be surprised to find that their profession is recognized on the list!

Thanks for reading! Happy Labor Day to travel nurses everywhere!

Share

5 Successful Interview Tips for the Travel Nurse

You just got a call back from your recruiter with the news. You have a phone interview for the travel nursing job of your dreams! You’ve got the experience and the job is in your dream location. You’re practically a shoe-in for the position. Or are you?

Interviews can be stressful, but with these tips, you can stay confident and land your dream job!

Interviews can be stressful, but with these tips, you can stay confident and land your dream job!

It’s easy to forget to prepare for your phone interview. After all, the hospital managers liked you enough on paper, so what’s the big deal? The fact remains that the interview is a critical phase of the job-seeking process, so you’ve got to do your homework. The phone interview not only helps the unit manager decide if you will be a good fit for their unit, but it’s also a wonderful tool to help you decide if this job will match your experience and goals as a traveler.

So, Travel Nursing Central has compiled a list of 5 interview tips for the travel nurse to help you prepare:

  1. Dress to Impress: Even though the unit manager won’t see what you’re wearing, it’s still a good idea to dress up for the phone interview. Why? People tend to act more professional when they wear formal clothes. Obviously, you still want to be comfortable, but remember to dress for success. And remember to smile! People can tell when you’re smiling over the phone.
  1. Research the Facility and Review Common Interview Questions: You can set yourself apart from the competition if you research the facility a little prior to the interview. Take a look at the hospital or healthcare facility’s website to see what they’re all about. You’ll also want to prepare your responses to common interview questions in advance. You’ll feel more confident going into the interview. So, if you’re asked “what do you know about our unit/facility?” you can answer without missing a beat.
  1. Stay Positive and Focus on Your Strengths: At some point in the interview, you might be asked about your experience in an area that you are unfamiliar with. Instead of saying, “I don’t have experience with that,” you should say, “I haven’t seen much of that yet, but I am willing to learn and help out wherever you need me.” Unit managers are always looking for go-getters, positive influences, and team players.
  1. Ask Insightful Questions: This is your chance to find out if the facility is a good fit for you. So, remember to ask questions that are important to you. You’ll want to know the size of the unit, the traveler to patient ratio, uniform requirements, and the hospital floating policy, just to name a few.
  1. Thank the Interviewer and Follow Up with Your Recruiter: It’s just good manners to thank the interviewer for his or her time. Also, sometimes, a unit manager might ask you at the end of the interview if you’ll accept the job. If you are unsure, the end of the interview is also a good time to let them know you will have an answer for them within 24 to 48 hours. After the interview, don’t forget to follow up with your recruiter. This shows that you’re still interested in the position and are persistent. If an offer is not made, you can also find out from your recruiter why so you’ll know for the next position.

With these 5 tips, you’ll be sure to ace your travel nurse interview. Good luck!

For all those veteran travel nurses out there, do you have any other interview tips? In your personal experience, what worked, and what didn’t?

Share

Zika Virus Hits the U.S.: 4 Things Travel Nurses Should Know

Late last week, healthcare officials’ fears were realized when several local cases of the Zika virus were identified in Miami. This is the first time cases of the Zika infection in the U.S. haven’t been linked to South American travel. Infections are expected to increase in parts of the U.S.  So, it’s important for all travel nurses, especially those currently working in Florida, to keep updated on the recent Zika news.  Here’s what travel nurses should know:

The Zika virus has spread to Florida. Learn how you can protect yourself and your patients.

The Zika virus has spread to Florida. Learn how you can protect yourself and your patients.

  1. Pregnant women should avoid travel to Miami: Earlier this spring, pregnant women were warned about traveling to South America due to the link between Zika infections in pregnant women and severe birth defects in their newborns. However, as a result of these new findings, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has expanded that travel ban to include the Wynwood neighborhood in downtown Miami. This is the first time the CDC has advised people not to travel to a place in the continental United States.
  1. The Zika virus can be sexually transmitted: Although only certain mosquitoes are responsible for most Zika cases, the infection can also be sexually transmitted. As a healthcare provider, you should caution both male and female patients who have recently traveled to Zika-affected areas to abstain from sexual intercourse for at least eight weeks. The virus has been known to remain in bodily fluids long after the symptoms are gone. If your patient is already pregnant and has recently traveled to Miami, you should advise her to get tested for Zika. This particular patient will also want to use condoms or avoid sex throughout the duration of her pregnancy.
  1. Prevention is key: If you or your patients are living in a Zika zone like Florida, you should take all necessary precautions. This includes staying indoors as much as possible, covering up, and wearing insect repellent such as Deet to prevent infection. If one of your patients does become infected, he or she will need to see a doctor right away. If a pregnant woman becomes infected, she will need to be carefully monitored throughout her pregnancy.
  1. Don’t panic: While the news seems grim, your patients don’t need to panic just yet. Only the Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes have been known to transmit the infection, and these mosquitoes must have bitten someone who’s infected in order to spread the virus to someone else. The CDC expected to see outbreaks of Zika in the U.S. where these types of mosquitoes are common. Florida is one of these areas. Fortunately, healthcare officials do not believe the outbreaks here will be as severe as the ones in South America.

To learn more about the latest Zika virus in Florida, you can visit the CDC’s website here.

Are you currently working in Florida as a travel nurse? If so, what steps are you taking to protect yourself and your patients?

Share

Top 6 Travel Nurse Myths Busted

You’ve been thinking about travel nursing as a career option for a while now, but you’ve been hesitant to take the plunge. Maybe, you don’t think you can hack it as a travel nurse because you’re naturally shy, or you’ve heard from your friends that travel nurses are given difficult patient loads. Well, Travel Nursing Central has busted the top 6 travel nurse myths wide open below. We bet you’ll be surprised by what you might learn.

Travel Nurse Myths

Don’t let rumors or myths scare you away from a rewarding travel nurse career.

  1. You Must Be Outgoing: While being an extrovert usually helps, it isn’t required in a travel nurse. In fact, most travel nurses believe that being a team player is the more important trait. You’ll make friends faster among the hospital staff if you can quickly learn the hospital’s routine, bring a positive attitude and hit the ground running with your awesome clinical skills. Outside of the hospital setting, there are plenty of perks to traveling alone. First of all, you get to schedule your adventures and enjoy them at your own pace. Going on a hike or indulging in your photography hobby are just some of the activities you can enjoy solo. However, if you’re still worried about how you might handle traveling, you can test the waters by sticking to a location fairly close to home. Then you can truly decide if the travel nurse lifestyle is for you.
  1. You Don’t Get to Choose Your Travel Assignments: Nothing could be further from the truth on this one. You absolutely have a choice when deciding where you want to travel. Your traveling company might not always have a job available in your dream location, but that doesn’t mean you have to go anywhere you don’t want to. Just let your recruiter know a few of your top location preferences and your recruiter will find jobs for you. Overall, remember to keep an open mind about where you decide to travel. You could be surprised to find that you enjoy the slower pace of a small town hospital compared to the rapid-fire pace at a sprawling facility in New York.
  1. You Can’t Take Your Pet with You: There are many companies that will accept your pets as a package deal and will gladly find pet-friendly housing for you. But, not all agencies are willing to let your furry friend come along for the ride. Moral of the story? Do your research before you sign a contract if you want to travel with your pet.
  1. You Aren’t Eligible for Benefits: Almost all travel staffing companies have a benefits package for their travelers, so this myth is a pretty easy one to debunk. However, benefit packages vary greatly with the traveling company. Here again, it pays to do your research. Find out which benefits are the most important to you and go with the company that offers them. You can start your research on TNC’s agency reviews page here.
  1. You Get the Worst Patient Assignments: There’s also the assumption out there that travel nurses get the worst patient assignments. Again, this isn’t usually the case. As a travel nurse, you are there to lighten the hospital’s patient load. Most staff members are happy to have you there, and your patient assignments won’t necessarily be more difficult than a permanent nurse’s load. However, if you know you don’t want to be a floater, put it in writing if possible. Your contract can sometimes be your best protection.
  1. You Will Make Tons More Money as a Travel Nurse: This myth is a bit of a gray area. Many times, travel nurse pay is typically better than a permanent position, but that might not always be the case. There are some assignments that are incredibly lucrative, but others can be comparable to seasoned nurses’ current pay. The key here is to remember that your pay as a travel nurse is usually based on a number of things, including whether or not you take company housing, enroll in company health insurance, and/or the location of your assignment. Again, this all depends on your travel company and how they handle pay. Be sure to ask your recruiter about this issue before you sign a contract, and remember the power of negotiation!
Share

Future Hiring Trends Look Bright for Travel Nurses

When the Affordable Care Act passed in 2010, healthcare in America changed forever. By 2022, the number of nursing jobs is expected to increase by 1.05 million. Likewise, travel nurses will also become a vital resource as the healthcare industry struggles to meet this growing demand.

Check out this infographic from Norwich University’s Master of Science in Nursing Program to learn more about how the Affordable Care Act affected the nursing industry. 

Share

Ask Travel Nursing Central: Contract Questions

Questions about travel nursing contracts

Reading your travel nursing contract can sometimes leave you with more questions than answers. It’s important to know what you’re signing up for when you agree to a travel assignment.

Your contract is arguably your most important tool to help you navigate the sometimes uncharted waters of your travel nursing career. It can also be the most confusing. Fortunately, Travel Nursing Central is here to help you map out your professional path. We posted some of your frequently asked questions about travel nursing contracts and our answers here. Please keep in mind that our website should not be substituted for legal counsel. Rather, we hope this information helps you become a better advocate for yourself. As always, we recommend that you speak with your recruiter before you sign or break your contract.

Question: “I am on my first assignment in Kentucky. I agreed to this job because the agency and the hospital both made it sound so much better than it actually is. I took a night shift job, which was a huge mistake. I’m not sleeping well, I’m sick 24/7, and I feel depressed and yuck. On top of that, my contract is extremely vague, and things don’t make any sense to me now. I missed a shift, and now they’re taking money away from me. I want out — I’m going through so much and frustrated. Help!”

Answer: “I’m so sorry your first traveling assignment hasn’t been a fun experience. Even though this trip wasn’t everything you’d hoped it would be, you still have options.

In your case, I recommend that you let your recruiter know how you’re feeling about this assignment so far. If your recruiter has your best interests at heart, she or he should be able to reassure you and offer advice on what to do next. Maybe this current assignment is almost done, and you can soon relocate to another hospital with better hours. After all, that’s the positive side of traveling nursing—most assignments are short.

If your assignment is truly unbearable, you can quit, but make sure you read your contract thoroughly so that you understand the consequences. Some contracts have monetary penalties for travelers who end an assignment early. Again, you can always ask your recruiter to go over your contract with you to explain anything that seems vague to you.

For future traveling assignments, I would also suggest thoroughly reviewing any new contract with your recruiter before you sign anything. It’s not always a joy to read all that legal jargon, but, if you do, you won’t ever again be surprised with any unexpected charges or fees. I hope you start feeling better, and enjoy future trips as a traveling nurse soon.”

Question: “I have been at my current travel assignment for almost a year. I have never done travel nursing before this. My travel agency and facility would both like me to renew, but I have heard from different people that you aren’t considered a contract nurse after a year at one facility. My travel agency says this isn’t a problem. What is your understanding of this? I would like to stay at this facility, but I don’t want any surprises if I decide to stay!”

Answer: “You can work at your current facility as long as you like. However, if you decide to stay, you will no longer be eligible to receive a housing stipend or a Per Diem allowance. If you work in the same location for a year, the IRS considers that location as your new permanent tax home. In the eyes of the IRS, you are no longer away from home, so you can’t receive the tax-free money. Whatever you decide, I hope this information helps you in your travel nursing career. Good luck!”

Question: “I am currently fulfilling a contract in California. I was told by my agency that the company I am working for is going to decrease my rate mid-contract. I found out that it was not affecting all travelers on my unit. When I called my agency upset about this rate change, they told me that I could either accept the rate change or my contract would be cancelled.  Can they do this?”

Answer: First of all, I’m sorry to hear that this assignment has been stressful for you. I would highly recommend asking your recruiter about your contract. I’m not a legal expert, but they should not be able to change the terms of your contract without consent on both sides and without proper notice. However, there could be provisions in your contract which would allow your agency to the cancel the assignment if you don’t agree. Without reading the specifics of your contract, I believe you have two choices in your current situation. You can accept the change and complete the assignment, or you decline the change and start looking for another position with another agency. Again, I would speak with your recruiter first to fully understand your options before you make any decisions in your current assignment. Thanks for writing and good luck!

For more FAQs regarding travel nursing contracts, please click here

Share

5 Tips On Treating a Difficult Patient as a Travel Nurse

Difficult patient

Don’t let a difficult patient ruin your shift. Keep your cool under pressure with these handy tips.

Travel nursing is a rewarding career, but sometimes, you’ll meet a patient who ruins your day with their attitude. You know the type: rude, demanding, or maybe even downright abusive. Whatever the patient’s behavior, it’s still your job to care for his or her needs. So how do you manage to remain the awesome care provider you are when you are confronted with a nightmare patient? Here’s a checklist to help you keep your cool when treating a difficult patient as a travel nurse:

  1. Remember It’s Not Personal: People are usually in a hospital for a reason — they are sick. They might also be afraid, lonely, or on medication that makes them irritable. Everyone reacts to these situations differently, so It’s important to remember that your patient probably isn’t at his or her best around you. Cut them a little slack.
  1. Connect: Sometimes, patients just need someone to listen to them. Ask them what they are worried about, how you can help them in the current situation, or even begin your response with, “I understand why you might feel that way.” In most cases, patients appreciate your efforts more when you show them you care about them as a person, not just another patient.
  1. Remain Calm: When a patient becomes verbally abusive, take a deep breath and stay calm. This doesn’t mean you have to plaster a fake smile on your face. You can diffuse a difficult situation with concise language. For example, it’s better to say, “I understand why you are upset. Please know that I am doing everything I can to help you,” than “I am doing all I can here. You will just have to wait.” It’s also a good idea to set a time limit for how long you are willing to listen to their complaints, and then if necessary, inform the patient you will return when they are ready to listen to you.
  1. Know Your Emotional Triggers: Everyone has their own emotional baggage. Be aware of yours and what language might trigger it. If you are easily hurt by negative comments, take a few moments alone to recover before moving on with your day. Try to stay positive with a good sense of humor about the situation.
  1. Recruit Help: Unfortunately, even the above tactics might not be enough in extreme cases. Sometimes patients can become violent. These patients might have a mental illness, be intoxicated or drugged. Whatever the reason for the outburst, you do not have to put up with physical abuse. When necessary, alert your immediate supervisor to the situation or call hospital security to help.

As a healthcare professional, you know that caring for difficult patients is part of the job. Although it’s not easy, handling these patients doesn’t always have to be a chore. These 5 tips on treating a difficult patient will help you remain a professional, confident travel nurse.

Share

6 Steps to Becoming a Culturally Competent Nurse

Culturally Competent Nurse

It’s important to be respectful of your patients’ cultural differences.

As a healthcare professional, you meet people from all different walks of life. Understanding your patients from a cultural standpoint can be a huge asset to your career. It’s especially important for traveling nurses to gain appreciation for the population they serve at their different assignments. In large cities, there can even be several subsets of cultures within the population your hospital serves.

So what’s a travel nurse supposed to do? Obviously, you can’t learn every single language out there or be an expert in all cultures, but you can prepare a culturally competent checklist for yourself when you encounter a patient with a different culture from your own. Below are six steps to becoming a culturally competent nurse:

  1. Communicate: Does this patient speak the same language as you? If not, find a hospital translator. Communication is obviously the first step in discovering your patient’s needs. As the translator is speaking with the patient, notice the patient’s nonverbal and verbal cues. Different cultures have different communication values.
  1. Determine Level of Comprehension: Does the patient understand you? Head nodding doesn’t always mean they “get it.” The patient might also be embarrassed to ask questions. So gently ask them to repeat what you told them in their own words. If the patient can’t, then you or a translator can re-explain a diagnosis or the situation at hand.
  1. Identify religious beliefs/sexual orientation: Religious beliefs can have a powerful effect on patients as they cope with serious illnesses or choose treatment options. As a nurse, you’ll want to be respectful of your patient’s religious views and discover what treatments your patient is willing to accept. For example, some religions choose the power of prayer over medical intervention. Likewise, it’s important to know your patient’s sexual orientation for similar reasons.
  1. Determine Level of Trust: It can be extremely hard to treat a patient without their trust. If they don’t trust you, they may withhold crucial health-related information. Earning a patient’s trust begins with effective communication. So, be open and honest when communicating with your patient, and use a translator when necessary.
  1. Discuss Dietary Habits: Just like religious views, dietary habits can be a cultural factor in the life of your patient. You’ll want to discuss these habits with your patient and respect their wishes as they recover from a procedure. Showing respect for their values will help increase their levels of comfort and trust with you as their healthcare provider.
  1. Recognize your own cultural biases: Everyone has their own biases and cultural attitudes, so it’s important to be aware of yours. As a nurse, you should not allow your own cultural views to interfere with the treatment of your patient. Not sure where you stand in the cultural spectrum as a nurse? Take Top RN to BSN’s quiz to find out.

As a travel nurse, has there ever been a time when you needed to be culturally sensitive while treating a patient? If so, what steps did you take to ensure you earned that patient’s trust?

Share