5 Successful Interview Tips for the Travel Nurse

You just got a call back from your recruiter with the news. You have a phone interview for the travel nursing job of your dreams! You’ve got the experience and the job is in your dream location. You’re practically a shoe-in for the position. Or are you?

Interviews can be stressful, but with these tips, you can stay confident and land your dream job!

Interviews can be stressful, but with these tips, you can stay confident and land your dream job!

It’s easy to forget to prepare for your phone interview. After all, the hospital managers liked you enough on paper, so what’s the big deal? The fact remains that the interview is a critical phase of the job-seeking process, so you’ve got to do your homework. The phone interview not only helps the unit manager decide if you will be a good fit for their unit, but it’s also a wonderful tool to help you decide if this job will match your experience and goals as a traveler.

So, Travel Nursing Central has compiled a list of 5 interview tips for the travel nurse to help you prepare:

  1. Dress to Impress: Even though the unit manager won’t see what you’re wearing, it’s still a good idea to dress up for the phone interview. Why? People tend to act more professional when they wear formal clothes. Obviously, you still want to be comfortable, but remember to dress for success. And remember to smile! People can tell when you’re smiling over the phone.
  1. Research the Facility and Review Common Interview Questions: You can set yourself apart from the competition if you research the facility a little prior to the interview. Take a look at the hospital or healthcare facility’s website to see what they’re all about. You’ll also want to prepare your responses to common interview questions in advance. You’ll feel more confident going into the interview. So, if you’re asked “what do you know about our unit/facility?” you can answer without missing a beat.
  1. Stay Positive and Focus on Your Strengths: At some point in the interview, you might be asked about your experience in an area that you are unfamiliar with. Instead of saying, “I don’t have experience with that,” you should say, “I haven’t seen much of that yet, but I am willing to learn and help out wherever you need me.” Unit managers are always looking for go-getters, positive influences, and team players.
  1. Ask Insightful Questions: This is your chance to find out if the facility is a good fit for you. So, remember to ask questions that are important to you. You’ll want to know the size of the unit, the traveler to patient ratio, uniform requirements, and the hospital floating policy, just to name a few.
  1. Thank the Interviewer and Follow Up with Your Recruiter: It’s just good manners to thank the interviewer for his or her time. Also, sometimes, a unit manager might ask you at the end of the interview if you’ll accept the job. If you are unsure, the end of the interview is also a good time to let them know you will have an answer for them within 24 to 48 hours. After the interview, don’t forget to follow up with your recruiter. This shows that you’re still interested in the position and are persistent. If an offer is not made, you can also find out from your recruiter why so you’ll know for the next position.

With these 5 tips, you’ll be sure to ace your travel nurse interview. Good luck!

For all those veteran travel nurses out there, do you have any other interview tips? In your personal experience, what worked, and what didn’t?

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Zika Virus Hits the U.S.: 4 Things Travel Nurses Should Know

Late last week, healthcare officials’ fears were realized when several local cases of the Zika virus were identified in Miami. This is the first time cases of the Zika infection in the U.S. haven’t been linked to South American travel. Infections are expected to increase in parts of the U.S.  So, it’s important for all travel nurses, especially those currently working in Florida, to keep updated on the recent Zika news.  Here’s what travel nurses should know:

The Zika virus has spread to Florida. Learn how you can protect yourself and your patients.

The Zika virus has spread to Florida. Learn how you can protect yourself and your patients.

  1. Pregnant women should avoid travel to Miami: Earlier this spring, pregnant women were warned about traveling to South America due to the link between Zika infections in pregnant women and severe birth defects in their newborns. However, as a result of these new findings, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has expanded that travel ban to include the Wynwood neighborhood in downtown Miami. This is the first time the CDC has advised people not to travel to a place in the continental United States.
  1. The Zika virus can be sexually transmitted: Although only certain mosquitoes are responsible for most Zika cases, the infection can also be sexually transmitted. As a healthcare provider, you should caution both male and female patients who have recently traveled to Zika-affected areas to abstain from sexual intercourse for at least eight weeks. The virus has been known to remain in bodily fluids long after the symptoms are gone. If your patient is already pregnant and has recently traveled to Miami, you should advise her to get tested for Zika. This particular patient will also want to use condoms or avoid sex throughout the duration of her pregnancy.
  1. Prevention is key: If you or your patients are living in a Zika zone like Florida, you should take all necessary precautions. This includes staying indoors as much as possible, covering up, and wearing insect repellent such as Deet to prevent infection. If one of your patients does become infected, he or she will need to see a doctor right away. If a pregnant woman becomes infected, she will need to be carefully monitored throughout her pregnancy.
  1. Don’t panic: While the news seems grim, your patients don’t need to panic just yet. Only the Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes have been known to transmit the infection, and these mosquitoes must have bitten someone who’s infected in order to spread the virus to someone else. The CDC expected to see outbreaks of Zika in the U.S. where these types of mosquitoes are common. Florida is one of these areas. Fortunately, healthcare officials do not believe the outbreaks here will be as severe as the ones in South America.

To learn more about the latest Zika virus in Florida, you can visit the CDC’s website here.

Are you currently working in Florida as a travel nurse? If so, what steps are you taking to protect yourself and your patients?

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