7 Holiday Posts for Travel Nurses

christmas tree stethoscope

Get in the spirit with these 7 Holiday posts for travel nurses.

With Thanksgiving just behind us, and Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, and New Year’s upon us, it’s a fun time to get swept up in the spirit of the season, regardless of how you choose to celebrate.

Considering the season, I thought this round-up of 7 Holiday posts for travel nurses could be a festive way for nurses everywhere to celebrate the season.

Enjoy!

  1. Aureus shared a post with tips on how to Tackle Your Stress — not Holiday-specific, but since the Holidays can be so stressful, definitely timely and helpful.
  2. Fastaff’s blog shared this a list of the Top 10 Holiday Gifts for Traveling Nurses.
  3. Travel Nursing Blogs shared their list of 33 Holiday Movies Travel Nurses Will Love.
  4. Scrubs Mag invited nurses to Enter to Win the Very Merry Nursesmas Giveaway, where nurses can enter to win scrubs.
  5. Medical Solutions’ Blog offered tips on How to Make your Location Home for the Holidays, as well as these printable ornaments for those spending the Holidays away from home.
  6. Diversity Nursing shared the story of a nine-year-old boy who was struck by lightning, but will be home in time for Christmas.
  7. Finally, check out this heartwarming video of a PICU nurse making the holidays in the hospital brighter by singing to a premature baby.

Have you seen any other great holiday posts? Please feel free to add on to our list of 7 Holiday posts for travel nurses in the comments!

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Make Yourself More Marketable, Step 2: Transitioning to higher acuity units

Mature cocoon transform to Tawny Coster butterfly

By Jeff Della Rosa

The Right Solutions

You have committed to the exciting field of travel nursing, and you want to be a successful healthcare traveler. You are ready to learn yet are unsure of the next step. We want to help you get there! We’ve spoken to long-time recruiters who have guided nurses and encouraged them on the path to success. They know what nurses have done to reach their goals. Our hope is that you land the job for you. This is part two in the series to help you get the job you want.

It’s time to determine your successful career path. Write down step-by-step the path you will take to reach the skill set you want and hang the plan on your mirror. Have a goal of where you want to be in a set number of years. Have patience and be realistic of how long it will take you to reach your goals. One cannot go from working in medical surgical to cardiovascular ICU overnight. As you develop your plan, choose a specialty you want to go into based on what you most enjoyed in nursing school. Select another specialty as a backup plan just in case.

Determine which certifications you will need. Take classes to earn them. If necessary, pay out of pocket for classes. For example, when working in medical surgical, a two-day oncology class might be offered for $200. Find out what assignments you will need to work. As an example, if you want to work in CVICU, recruiters recommend at least two years of experience in CVICU before working the unit as a travel nurse. Bring permanent experience to the job. Two years of experience working in a field such as ICU will help before starting to travel. This experience would allow you to transition from progressive telemetry to ICU.

Volunteer to float to different specialties during your assignments. Some specialties, such as medical surgical and oncology, might be on the same floor. Ask to float to work in other specialties. If you are in medical surgical, see if you can float to progressive telemetry or ICU. Put in your contract that you are willing to float to the units in which you have competency. Travel nurses are often the first to be asked to float. If available, accept opportunities to float to higher acuities. If moved to a higher acuity unit, learn from supervisors and ask questions. If working in progressive telemetry, you might watch a charge nurse remove wires from patients who have just come out of open heart surgery. Then, as you build up their trust in you, you might be given the opportunity to pull the wires. Gain more experience by shadowing a nurse on your own time. Make connections and develop a network of contacts to help you reach your goal.

Find out where help is needed.  Ask to be transferred to another department if a position you want becomes available. A hospital would rather move an existing nurse into an open position than hire someone new. Be flexible and have a good attitude. Do not narrow down your options. The more positions you are submitted for, the more interviews you will get. The more interviews you get the more offers you will have from which to choose.

Accept positions at teaching hospitals or academic medical centers. A teaching hospital offers opportunities to learn new skills while on the job. For example, if you are learning to treat burns, the charge nurse would see patients with serious cases, and they might be transferred to you to attend to as they recover. Gradually, you will be given more responsibility until you start to treat the more serious burns. These hospitals operate in conjunction with a university and foster a learning environment. Not only will nurses be developing their skills there, but also future physicians will be working on their residency there. The skills you learn at teaching hospitals will help you get assignments in the future. Here are some links to teaching hospitals: The University of New Mexico Hospital in Albuquerque, N.M., The University of Oklahoma Medical Center in Oklahoma City, Memorial Hermann in Houston, Texas.

While taking on new skills as a nurse is important to your career development, you might find that you are still struggling to get an interview for the job you want. Check back next month for the third blog about getting interviews.

Plan for success in Travel NursingJeff Della Rosa is social media coordinator for The Right Solutions — a nationwide healthcare staffing company. Reach him via email at jdellarosa@therightsolutions.com. Find out more about The Right Solutions on our website, www.therightsolutions.com. Also, check us out on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Pinterest.

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Travel Nursing Checklists

Travel Nursing Checklists

Check out these Travel Nursing Checklists!

There’s a lot to think of when you embark on a career as a travel nurse!

Whether you’re brand new or a vet, our Travel Nursing Checklists can be a huge help in getting and staying organized. We offer checklists that help you manage and navigate:

  • Travel Nursing Hospital Interview Questions — Put your best face forward and highlight your skills and flexible personality when interviewing.
  • Travel Nursing Agency Questions — Know what questions to ask when you are researching companies.
  • Travel Nursing Housing Questions — Know what questions to ask when making housing requests.
  • List of What Travel Nurses Pack — Make sure you think of all the important items that you will need while on assignment.
  • List of Documents Needed For Travel Nursing — Be prepared with all of the appropriate paperwork you will need to begin a job in travel nursing.
  • Travel Nursing Companies’ Contact Info — Contact more than 300 travel nursing agencies and figure out which company is the best fit for you.

Click here to check out our Travel Nursing Checklists in greater detail! We hope that they will help you find the right company and assignment, and ease your way from interviewing, to packing, to your first day on the job.

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